Environmental Cleaning

According to the CDC, reducing the risk of exposure to COVID-19 by cleaning and disinfection is an important part of reopening public spaces.

Current evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2 may remain viable for hours to days on surfaces made from a variety of materials.1 Routine cleaning and disinfecting are an important part of reducing the risk of exposure to COVID-19.2

TIPS FOR AN EFFECTIVE CLEAN

Studies have shown that harmful pathogens can live on surfaces for up to 5 months3, thus the CDC describes proper environmental cleaning as a "fundamental intervention for infection prevention and control".4

The Association for Healthcare Environment (AHE) recommends the below best practices to help with optimal environmental cleaning and disinfection.

GO FROM CLEAN TO DIRTY

Cleaning low-touch areas first and high-touch areas last reduces the likelihood of spreading infection and contaminants.

CLEAN FROM TOP TO BOTTOM

Microbes and dirt dislodged from high surfaces naturally fall to lower surfaces.

CLEAN SYSTEMATICALLY

Clean from the outside walls of the room to the center of the room, no surface is skipped; this process saves time and is more ergonomic.

WIPE IN ONE DIRECTION

Circular wiping recontaminates surface areas, while wiping unidirectionally ensures solution is applied to the whole surface.

floor cleaning tips

Floor cleaning is an important step in the cleaning process not only to remove dirt, dust, and debris, but to disinfect the surface where germs are commonly spread throughout a facility.

When cleaning floor surfaces, the ‘figure 8’ motion is recommended to prevent cross-contamination and keep track of dirty and already cleaned surfaces.

1. Dust mop or sweep area to remove all debris, dirt and large objects from the mopping area.

2. For traditional wet mopping, the CDC recommends using sterile wet mops or freshly machine-laundered wet mops.

3. Remove the used mop head from the handle and refresh with newly laundered mop per facility recommendations.

4. Fill the mop bucket with new diluted floor cleaning solution as recommended per chemical-specified guidelines.

MICROFIBER cleaning

Microfiber cleaning products (e.g. cloths and mop pads) have been shown in a number of studies to achieve superior surface cleaning compared to traditional cotton products.5-7 Microfiber products are not only more effective at capturing and removing microbes from surfaces, but their use as part of a larger infection prevention and control strategy has been associated with reductions in HAIs.5

Microfiber’s split fiber design creates a larger surface area for microbe removal.6 At the same time, the positive charge of the microfiber attracts negatively-charged particles including dirt and microorganisms.7

Reducing Cross-Contamination

The eight-sided fold methodology for microfiber cloths helps maximize the use of the cloth while reducing the risk of cross-contamination during the cleaning process.

Step 1

Begin with an open, clean Microfiber cloth.

Step 2

Fold Microfiber cloth in half.

Step 3

Fold Microfiber cloth in quarters.

Step 4

Clean surfaces with two exposed sides of cloth.

Step 5

Open Microfiber cloth once to change sides.

Step 6

Refold to expose two fresh cleaning sides.

Step 7

Open cloth fully once four sides have been used.

Step 8

Repeat steps 2 through 7 to use all eight sides.

Color is also a visually effective way to prevent cross-contamination.

The below colors are commonly used within different areas of a facility per industry guidelines.*

1. HIGH RISK AREAS AND OPERATING ROOM BEDS
2. HIGH GLASS AND POLISHED SURFACES
3. BATHROOMS
4. GENERAL PURPOSE
5. SPECIALTY AREAS

*Recommended use can vary by vertical and application.
Follow all established safety procedures

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cleaning and Disinfection for Community Facilities. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/cleaning-disinfection.html Accessed 29 April 2020.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools and Homes. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/pdf/Reopening_America_Guidance.pdf Accessed 29 April 2020.

3. Claro T, Daniels S, Humphreys H. Detecting Clostridium difficile spores from inanimate surfaces of the hospital environment: which method is best?. J Clin Microbiol. 2014;52(9):3426–3428. doi:10.1128/JCM.01011-14

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Best practices for environmental cleaning in healthcare facilities in resource-limited settings. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/hai/pdfs/resource-limited/environmental-cleaning-508.pdf Accessed 7 February 2020

5. Lister DM, Kotsanas D, Ballards SA, Howden BP, Carse E, Tan K, et al. Outbreak of vanB vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium colonization in a neonatal service. Am J Infect Control 2015; 43: 1061-5.

6. Trajtman AN, Manickam K, Alfa MJ. Microfiber cloths reduce the transfer of Clostridium difficile spores to environmental surfaces compared with cotton cloths. Am J Infect Control 2015; 43: 686-9.

7. Rutala WA, Gergen MF, Weber DJ. Microbiologic evaluation of microfiber mops for surface disinfection. Am J Infect Control 2007; 35: 569-73.

8. Gillespie E, Brown R, Treagus D, James A, Jackson C. Improving operating room cleaning results with microfiber and steam technology. Am J Infect Control 2016; 44: 120-2.

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